After 11 years of bringing you local reporting, the team behind the Vancouver Observer has moved on to Canada's National Observer. You can follow Vancouver culture reporting over there from now on. Thank you for all your support over the years!

Amy Huva

Amy Huva is an environmental chemist and writer from Melbourne, Australia who worked for the Australian Federal Government on agricultural water reform and the Montreal Protocol. She is currently working in the environmental sector in Vancouver, Canada.

 

Sleepwalking off a cliff: can we avoid global collapse?

The earth is overpopulated and burning up all our resources faster than we can stop to think about it. Could we be sleepwalking off the climate cliff?

When nerds go viral

Thanks to a Facebook page, there are 3million people on the internet who are happy to declare that they don’t just like science, they f*cking love science.

Climate change bringing bacteria infections to Baltic

Warming sea surface temperatures in low-salinity oceans like the Baltic Sea is increasing cases of Vibrio bacteria infections.

Hot Enough Yet? Warming in Western North America

How much and in what ways has the western part of North America warmed from climate change between 1950 and 2005?

Let Them Eat Cake? Feeding 9 Billion People

What changes will need to be made to agricultural practices in order to double food production for predicted population growth this century?

Australia's "catastrophic" fire risk is the new climate reality

Hotter than hot - this week the Australian Bureau of Meteorology had to extend their temperature scales beyond 50 degrees Celsius.

Climate ethics and the smoker’s excuse

The new climate denier's excuse for inaction is the smoker's excuse: 'you've got to die of something, right?'

Renewable reality: feasible and inexpensive

Aiming for 90% or more renewable energy in 2030 in order to achieve climate change targets of 80-90% reduction of CO2 from the power sector leads to economic savings, not costs.

Will the well run dry? Non-renewable water

Groundwater is estimated to be 1/3 of all freshwater withdrawals worldwide and 42% of the world’s agricultural water. With climate change affecting rain patterns, what will happen to groundwater?

Climate change: the Inuit now have a word for ‘robin’

What’s happening in the Arctic now is what will be happening to us in the next few decades, unless people act fast.